LOOKING TO HAVE THE BEST
RV EXPERIENCE?

You've come to the right place, we'll show you how...

Taking our friends and family RVing can be one of the most delightful experiences ever or it can be a dud. The key is having the right equipment and having it work properly so you can focus on enjoying the moment. We get it.


Taking our friends and family RVing can be one of the most delightful experiences ever or it can be a dud. The key is having the right equipment and having it work properly so you can focus on enjoying the moment. We get it.


BOONDOCKING OR SHOREPOWER?


RVs come in different shapes and sizes to fit a host of different people and needs. Whether you’re using a motorhome, 5th wheel, bumper pull, living quarters or some creative overland RV, you’ve got to have the right equipment to make the best of your RV experiences. And that equipment setup depends on if you’re going to have access to power to plug your RV into while using it—called Shore Power—or if you're going to be boondocking it (off-grid) without any plug in shore power. So, which one will use being doing most?


LEARN MORE

Shore Power

Some prefer RVing where power is supplied for your RV—often called Shore Power—that you plug into. While shore power is great because most of your power needs are taken care of, sometimes you’ll need to have power when there is no shore power, by force or by choice. Your options are battery power or generator power. If you don’t mind the noise of a generator, the need for fuel and the fumes that come with it, or the maintenance, a generator is an alternate source of power. But if you want peace and quiet, something good for you and for the environment, and that’s renewable from the sun, lithium battery power is the way to go. Learn More

A helpful hint... There is a solar generator that is safe, silent and renewable that you can find in the “Other Great Solutions ” section below called the Lion Safari ME. Learn More

For the greatest flexibility so you can boondock sometimes and plug in other times, we recommend getting setup for boondocking and you'll then also be set for shore power. This way you'll have the freedom to enjoy your RV experience wherever the wind and your desires takes you.

Boondocking

When you're RVing in the great outdoors, away from shore power, you need to have a steady source of power for slide outs and to keep all your conveniences in the RV running—TV, microwave, lights, AC, heater, etc. You'll need to have the right amount of that power. And you’ll need a way to keep that source putting out power for as long as you want to boondock. Usually that means batteries, and not just any batteries. You want batteries with ample power and ones that last. You need to seriously look at Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries! They're amazing. Learn More

Many RVers also have a generator to use for selected auxiliary power that puts a heavy load or use of power, such as when you want to use the AC for extended periods. Lithium batteries can handle that too, especially if you're also using solar panels with your RV that recharge your batteries. Learn More Generators have some limitations that we'll discuss later on like noise, fuel, fumes, and maintenance.

For now, you'll need to consider what you want to power in the RV and for how long. Lithium batteries will take care of most, if not all of that. And we recommend Lithium over lead acid batteries for a host of reason we'll discuss in that section below. Learn More


BOONDOCKING OR SHOREPOWER?


RVs come in different shapes and sizes to fit a host of different people and needs. Whether you’re using a motorhome, 5th wheel, bumper pull, living quarters or some creative overland RV, you’ve got to have the right equipment to make the best of your RV experiences. And that equipment setup depends on if you’re going to have access to power to plug your RV into while using it—called Shore Power—or if you're going to be boondocking it (off-grid) without any plug in shore power. So, which one will use being doing most?


LEARN MORE

Shore Power

Some prefer RVing where power is supplied for your RV—often called Shore Power—that you plug into. While shore power is great because most of your power needs are taken care of, sometimes you’ll need to have power when there is no shore power, by force or by choice. Your options are battery power or generator power. If you don’t mind the noise of a generator, the need for fuel and the fumes that come with it, or the maintenance, a generator is an alternate source of power. But if you want peace and quiet, something good for you and for the environment, and that’s renewable from the sun, lithium battery power is the way to go. Learn More

A helpful hint... There is a solar generator that is safe, silent and renewable that you can find in the “Other Great Solutions ” section below called the Lion Safari ME. Learn More

For the greatest flexibility so you can boondock sometimes and plug in other times, we recommend getting setup for boondocking and you'll then also be set for shore power. This way you'll have the freedom to enjoy your RV experience wherever the wind and your desires takes you.

Boondocking

When you're RVing in the great outdoors, away from shore power, you need to have a steady source of power for slide outs and to keep all your conveniences in the RV running—TV, microwave, lights, AC, heater, etc. You'll need to have the right amount of that power. And you’ll need a way to keep that source putting out power for as long as you want to boondock. Usually that means batteries, and not just any batteries. You want batteries with ample power and ones that last. You need to seriously look at Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries! They're amazing. Learn More

Many RVers also have a generator to use for selected auxiliary power that puts a heavy load or use of power, such as when you want to use the AC for extended periods. Lithium batteries can handle that too, especially if you're also using solar panels with your RV that recharge your batteries. Learn More Generators have some limitations that we'll discuss later on like noise, fuel, fumes, and maintenance.

For now, you'll need to consider what you want to power in the RV and for how long. Lithium batteries will take care of most, if not all of that. And we recommend Lithium over lead acid batteries for a host of reason we'll discuss in that section below. Learn More


TYPES OF POWER YOU
CAN USE


If you're not plugged into shore power, you can use a generator or batteries to power your RV. Many RVers use a combination of both, relying on the batteries for powering most things.


GENERATOR POWER 

Generators can provide a good source of power because they often have a higher output (watts) so they can run things that require lots of power AND that you want to run for long periods of time, like your AC. Fuel-based generators are an option but they also have some limitations:

  • Requires fuel so you need to have a supply of gas on hand and keep restocking that based on how much you use the generator.
  • Emits fume or other types of pollutants so you can't use them indoors and their not as friendly to the environment.
  • Noise levels vary but generators can be noisy which means you'll want to set them far enough away from the RV that you're not bothered by the noise. That also means their a bit more likely to "walk off" when you're not looking. Also, if your at a designated campsite, most have a noise restriction time where you can't run your generator, and therefore can't power things inside the RV during those restricted times.
  • Maintenance plans need to be put into place just like any fuel-driven piece of equipment. Generators require maintenance.

Tip: There is a high-quality lithium generator you can plug your RV into that you might want to check out. It doesn't have the above limitations. It's called the Lion Safari ME. Learn More

 

BATTERY POWER

Batteries can offset the limitations of using a generator to power your RV. Just make sure you're using high-quality Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries. Most people get at least 2 but often increase that to 4-6 depending on how long they want to power things on a single charge of the batteries. Here's some key advantages of lithium iron phosphate batteries over fuel-based generators:

  • No gas is needed. You can recharge them by harnessing the power of the sun using solar panels.

  • No pollutants or fumes. Lithium batteries are eco-friendly and can be used inside your RV.

  • Silent. You won't have to worry about noise restrictions and waking up to the generator turning on.

  • No Maintenance. They'll hold a charge for over a year if you don't use it during that time. They don't have to be kept on a trickle charger and you don't have to add water or other fluids. And since they don't use any water, they won't freeze in extreme cold weather.

Tip: Since lithium batteries don't emit fumes or pollutants, keep them inside your RV in the basement, under the bed space or similar place. This keeps them protected and in a temperature regulated area. And you won't have to worry about them disappearing from the trailer tongue.

 

 


TYPES OF POWER YOU
CAN USE

If you're not plugged into shore power, you can use a generator or batteries to power your RV. Many RVers use a combination of both, relying on the batteries for powering most things.

GENERATOR POWER 

Generators can provide a good source of power because they often have a higher output (watts) so they can run things that require lots of power AND that you want to run for long periods of time, like your AC. Fuel-based generators are an option but they also have some limitations:

  • Requires fuel so you need to have a supply of gas on hand and keep restocking that based on how much you use the generator.
  • Emits fume or other types of pollutants so you can't use them indoors and their not as friendly to the environment.
  • Noise levels vary but generators can be noisy which means you'll want to set them far enough away from the RV that you're not bothered by the noise. That also means their a bit more likely to "walk off" when you're not looking. Also, if your at a designated campsite, most have a noise restriction time where you can't run your generator, and therefore can't power things inside the RV during those restricted times.
  • Maintenance plans need to be put into place just like any fuel-driven piece of equipment. Generators require maintenance.

Tip: There is a high-quality lithium generator you can plug your RV into that you might want to check out. It doesn't have the above limitations. It's called the Lion Safari ME. Learn More

 

BATTERY POWER

Batteries can offset the limitations of using a generator to power your RV. Just make sure you're using high-quality Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries. Most people get at least 2 but often increase that to 4-6 depending on how long they want to power things on a single charge of the batteries. Here's some key advantages of lithium iron phosphate batteries over fuel-based generators:

  • No gas is needed. You can recharge them by harnessing the power of the sun using solar panels.

  • No pollutants or fumes. Lithium batteries are eco-friendly and can be used inside your RV.

  • Silent. You won't have to worry about noise restrictions and waking up to the generator turning on.

  • No Maintenance. They'll hold a charge for over a year if you don't use it during that time. They don't have to be kept on a trickle charger and you don't have to add water or other fluids. And since they don't use any water, they won't freeze in extreme cold weather.

Tip: Since lithium batteries don't emit fumes or pollutants, keep them inside your RV in the basement, under the bed space or similar place. This keeps them protected and in a temperature regulated area. And you won't have to worry about them disappearing from the trailer tongue.

 

 


WHY USE LITHIUM BATTERIES AND WHICH ONE IS BEST?


All batteries are not the same. There's the traditional lead acid battery and there are superior lithium battery (yah, we're a little biased but we'll share the facts with you so you can see why).


LEAD ACID VS LITHIUM COMPARISON

Lead Acid Batteries

Lead acid batteries have been around a long time and they come in various shapes and sizes including "golf cart" and AGM to Deep Cycle and more. Here's some things to consider with any lead acid battery:

Usable Energy. The energy in the battery is expressed in terms of Amp hours (Ah). Lead acid batteries often state its Ah as one thing but what is actually usable is another. For example, it may say it has 100Ah but lead acid batteries typically only use approximately 50% of that so you are really getting 50Ah of usable energy out of the battery. And if you drop much below that depth of discharge, you stand to damage or lose the use of the battery altogether. And that means replacing it.

Maintenance. Taking care of a lead acid battery is important to extend its life. Some require fluid to be added, cleaning the terminal posts from chemicals, and have some type of trickle charging on the battery so they don't go dead after a few months of not using it.

Weight. Because you have to handle a lead acid battery from time to time, weight becomes an issue. Lead acid batteries range from 45 lbs or so to nearly 120 lbs or more for some deep cycle batteries. That's a lot of weight... and strain on the back.

Value. This includes the initial purchase price and the cost of maintenance and replacement. Lead acid batteries purchase prices range from just under $100 to over $300 depending on type and quality. Then you need to figure in maintenance and replacement costs as most lead acid batteries, even if maintained properly, last 3-5 years at most. That's why their warranties are usually only for that timeframe and are also prorated so you don't get as much use or value. Most people don't remember to do the proper maintenance so they have to replace the batteries every year, over and over again.

Lithium Batteries

Lithium batteries are a newer, more advanced technology than lead acid. They come in different shapes and sizes too. For RV use, they commonly are Lithium Iron Phosphate and provide several advantages over lead acid batteries. Let's use the same topics as shown on the left under lead acid batteries as a comparison:

Useable Energy. Lithium can use all of the stated Ah so if the battery says it has 100Ah, it means you can use 100Ah and do that over and over again. Most lithium batteries also have a Battery Management System (BMS) that regulates and protects the battery from things like over charging and over discharging. In practical terms, this means you'll get about 2X the camp time using a lithium battery vs a lead acid battery. And that allows you to enjoy more time on your adventure and with family and friends.

Length of Use. As we discussed, the average Life Cycle of a typical lead acid battery is about 300 cycles. A lithium battery is more than 10X that or 3,500 if you completely use the energy in it each time and then recharge it again. It can last over 5,000 times if you don't always completely discharge it each time you use it. That means if you use all the energy in the lithium and recharge it—every single day—it will last almost 10 years and still have about 80% of its capacity left. Try that with lead acid batteries—not!

Maintenance. With the chemistry makeup of a lithium battery, there is virtually no maintenance needed. You can disconnect the wires to the terminals during the off season and simply leave the battery in your RV. When you're ready to use it again, reconnect and you're ready to go. You may want to top it off with a charge and then go.

Weight. Lithium batteries are much, much lighter than lead acid batteries, especially deep cycle lead acid ones. The Lion Safari UT 1300 lithium battery weighs only 23 lbs. Other lithium batteries are just over 30 lbs. So, you can move them around easily and remember, they have 2X the useable energy than lead acid too.

Value. When you take into account the initial cost, no maintenance, longer use and more usable energy, lighter weight and longer warranties, lithium is a much better value. It's more upfront but worth every penny.

 

We Suggest the Lifetime Warranty

LION SAFARI UT 1300

LITHIUM IRON PHOSPHATE BATTERY

Lithium batteries are great. However, not all lithium batteries are the same. So, which one is best? Check out the Lion Safari UT 1300 lithium iron phosphate battery. It has some critical advantages over the rest:

LIFETIME WARRANTY

You don't want to worry about how long the battery is going to last before you have to replace it. Mostly lithium batteries have a limited warranty of 8-10 years. The Safari UT 1300 has a lifetime warranty. It's the last battery you'll have to buy. Yup, a lifetime warranty.

MORE USABLE ENERGY & POWER

The Safari UT 1300 has 105Ah of stored energy, which is more than other lithium batteries and it can output 150A continuously and over a 900A peak. Others have 100Ah and only 100A of continuous output.

LESS WEIGHT

When you have to move a battery or you're needing a lighter load in your RV, weight matters. The Safari UT 1300 only weighs 23 lbs compared to 30+ lbs of other lithium brands.

STANDARD SIZE

Batteries come in "Group Size" which is basically how big the outer casing is. The Safari UT 1300 is the standard size (24), which is also smaller than other lithium brands. Others are 27 or 31 sizes so you might not be able to fit them into the space you want to.

SMART BATTERY

An advanced smart Battery Management System (BMS) manages and protects the Safari UT 1300 battery. As part of that, it has a light indicator and reset button on the top so you can see how much energy is in it and has the flexibility to easily reset itself. Other lithium batteries don't.

CAN NOT OVER CHARGE

You can not overcharge your Lion battery. The Smart BMS is like a battery guard, it protects and regulates the battery from over charging.

WHY USE LITHIUM BATTERIES AND WHICH ONE IS BEST?


All batteries are not the same. There's the traditional lead acid battery and there are superior lithium battery (yah, we're a little biased but we'll share the facts with you so you can see why).


LEAD ACID VS LITHIUM COMPARISON

Lead Acid Batteries

Lead acid batteries have been around a long time and they come in various shapes and sizes including "golf cart" and AGM to Deep Cycle and more. Here's some things to consider with any lead acid battery:

Usable Energy. The energy in the battery is expressed in terms of Amp hours (Ah). Lead acid batteries often state its Ah as one thing but what is actually usable is another. For example, it may say it has 100Ah but lead acid batteries typically only use approximately 50% of that so you are really getting 50Ah of usable energy out of the battery. And if you drop much below that depth of discharge, you stand to damage or lose the use of the battery altogether. And that means replacing it.

Maintenance. Taking care of a lead acid battery is important to extend its life. Some require fluid to be added, cleaning the terminal posts from chemicals, and have some type of trickle charging on the battery so they don't go dead after a few months of not using it.

Weight. Because you have to handle a lead acid battery from time to time, weight becomes an issue. Lead acid batteries range from 45 lbs or so to nearly 120 lbs or more for some deep cycle batteries. That's a lot of weight... and strain on the back.

Value. This includes the initial purchase price and the cost of maintenance and replacement. Lead acid batteries purchase prices range from just under $100 to over $300 depending on type and quality. Then you need to figure in maintenance and replacement costs as most lead acid batteries, even if maintained properly, last 3-5 years at most. That's why their warranties are usually only for that timeframe and are also prorated so you don't get as much use or value. Most people don't remember to do the proper maintenance so they have to replace the batteries every year, over and over again.

Lithium Batteries

Lithium batteries are a newer, more advanced technology than lead acid. They come in different shapes and sizes too. For RV use, they commonly are Lithium Iron Phosphate and provide several advantages over lead acid batteries. Let's use the same topics as shown on the left under lead acid batteries as a comparison:

Useable Energy. Lithium can use all of the stated Ah so if the battery says it has 100Ah, it means you can use 100Ah and do that over and over again. Most lithium batteries also have a Battery Management System (BMS) that regulates and protects the battery from things like over charging and over discharging. In practical terms, this means you'll get about 2X the camp time using a lithium battery vs a lead acid battery. And that allows you to enjoy more time on your adventure and with family and friends.

Length of Use. As we discussed, the average Life Cycle of a typical lead acid battery is about 300 cycles. A lithium battery is more than 10X that or 3,500 if you completely use the energy in it each time and then recharge it again. It can last over 5,000 times if you don't always completely discharge it each time you use it. That means if you use all the energy in the lithium and recharge it—every single day—it will last almost 10 years and still have about 80% of its capacity left. Try that with lead acid batteries—not!

Maintenance. With the chemistry makeup of a lithium battery, there is virtually no maintenance needed. You can disconnect the wires to the terminals during the off season and simply leave the battery in your RV. When you're ready to use it again, reconnect and you're ready to go. You may want to top it off with a charge and then go.

Weight. Lithium batteries are much, much lighter than lead acid batteries, especially deep cycle lead acid ones. The Lion Safari UT 1300 lithium battery weighs only 23 lbs. Other lithium batteries are just over 30 lbs. So, you can move them around easily and remember, they have 2X the useable energy than lead acid too.

Value. When you take into account the initial cost, no maintenance, longer use and more usable energy, lighter weight and longer warranties, lithium is a much better value. It's more upfront but worth every penny.

We Suggest the Lifetime Warranty

LION SAFARI UT 1300

LITHIUM IRON PHOSPHATE BATTERY

Lithium batteries are great. However, not all lithium batteries are the same. So, which one is best? Check out the Lion Safari UT 1300 lithium iron phosphate battery. It has some critical advantages over the rest:

LIFETIME WARRANTY

You don't want to worry about how long the battery is going to last before you have to replace it. Mostly lithium batteries have a limited warranty of 8-10 years. The Safari UT 1300 has a lifetime warranty. It's the last battery you'll have to buy. Yup, a lifetime warranty.

MORE USABLE ENERGY & POWER

The Safari UT 1300 has 105Ah of stored energy, which is more than other lithium batteries and it can output 150A continuously and over a 900A peak. Others have 100Ah and only 100A of continuous output.

LESS WEIGHT

When you have to move a battery or you're needing a lighter load in your RV, weight matters. The Safari UT 1300 only weighs 23 lbs compared to 30+ lbs of other lithium brands.

STANDARD SIZE

Batteries come in "Group Size" which is basically how big the outer casing is. The Safari UT 1300 is the standard size (24), which is also smaller than other lithium brands. Others are 27 or 31 sizes so you might not be able to fit them into the space you want to.

SMART BATTERY

An advanced smart Battery Management System (BMS) manages and protects the Safari UT 1300 battery. As part of that, it has a light indicator and reset button on the top so you can see how much energy is in it and has the flexibility to easily reset itself. Other lithium batteries don't.

CAN NOT OVER CHARGE

You can not overcharge your Lion battery. The Smart BMS is like a battery guard, it protects and regulates the battery from over charging.

Sold out

12.8V, 105Ah, 150A Continuous, 1344Wh
23 lbs. Group 24 Size
Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery

Sold out

12.8V, 56Ah, 100A Continuous, 716Wh
16.5 lbs. Group 24 Size
Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery

Sold out

12.8V, 105Ah, 150A Continuous, 1344Wh
23 lbs. Group 24 Size
Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery

Sold out

12.8V, 56Ah, 100A Continuous, 716Wh
16.5 lbs. Group 24 Size
Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery

CONNECTING & CHARGING YOUR LITHIUM BATTERIES


Most lithium iron phosphate batteries are designed to be an easy replacement for lead acid batteries in your RV or to be installed as new batteries in your RV. To get started with some basics, check out the areas below.


 

You can DIY or have a pro help. There's lots of YouTube videos to show you how. However, here are some basics:

First, take a picture of the current batteries and how they're connected. You're basically going to disconnect the lead acid batteries and remove them and then reinstall the lithium batteries the same way (thus the picture is handy to have). We recommend the Safari UT 1300 lithium iron phosphate batteries. The old batteries were likely connected together to use all the energy in all the batteries. That connection type is called parallel. You can tell because the connection between the batteries are + to + (red to red) and - to - (black to black). You'll also have a connection from the RV to the first lithium battery (via + post) and a connection from the last battery in parallel to the RV (via - post). If you've been using 6V batteries, they will also have been connected in "series" to increase the voltage to a standard 12V system. That connection between batteries is + to -. The Safari UT 1300 are already 12V so you just need to connect them in parallel.

Tip: Motorhomes need to have a DC to DC adaptor because you'll be charging from the alternator. A pro comes in handy for this.

Check out the video above so see how one person did his connection. It's a pretty in-depth video.

Do I need special equipment?
We often get asked if you need any special equipment to go from lead acid to lithium i.e. "What about charging?" and we'll cover that in the How to Charge your Lithium Battery section below.

If you are putting batteries in your RV for the first time, we recommend you have a pro do that for you and have them install at least 2 Safari UT 1300 batteries. Most RV dealers or repair shops can do that for you. We have a list of some of those dealers here.

You can use a standard battery charger and it will charge the lithium batteries just fine. However, since most chargers are designed for a lead acid battery, they are made to charge up to a certain voltage. On a lead acid battery their "full" is about 13.6V. The Safari UT 1300 can accept a charge up to 14.6V (full will be between 13.9V to 14.6V). So, most lead acid chargers will get the lithium batteries to nearly 13.6V and it will be about 80% full. That still is more energy than a lead acid battery. Some lead acid chargers are programmable, meaning you can set it to charge at certain rates. If your charger is programmable, set it to its highest setting in terms of volts i.e. "Lithium" or "Deep Cycle" or if it is customizable (i.e. Bulk, Absorb, Float or Equalize) set it to its highest voltage on each. It will basically be charging the lithium batteries faster and more completely. The built-in Battery Management System (BMS) will regulate the charge and shut it off when the battery is full.

For best performance, we recommend a lithium charger. It's a fairly inexpensive upgrade but well worth it.


 

CONNECTING & CHARGING YOUR LITHIUM BATTERIES


Most lithium iron phosphate batteries are designed to be an easy replacement for lead acid batteries in your RV or to be installed as new batteries in your RV. To get started with some basics, check out the areas below.


You can DIY or have a pro help. There's lots of YouTube videos to show you how. However, here are some basics:

First, take a picture of the current batteries and how they're connected. You're basically going to disconnect the lead acid batteries and remove them and then reinstall the lithium batteries the same way (thus the picture is handy to have). We recommend the Safari UT 1300 lithium iron phosphate batteries. The old batteries were likely connected together to use all the energy in all the batteries. That connection type is called parallel. You can tell because the connection between the batteries are + to + (red to red) and - to - (black to black). You'll also have a connection from the RV to the first lithium battery (via + post) and a connection from the last battery in parallel to the RV (via - post). If you've been using 6V batteries, they will also have been connected in "series" to increase the voltage to a standard 12V system. That connection between batteries is + to -. The Safari UT 1300 are already 12V so you just need to connect them in parallel.

Tip: Motorhomes need to have a DC to DC adaptor because you'll be charging from the alternator. A pro comes in handy for this.

Check out the video above so see how one person did his connection. It's a pretty in-depth video.

Do I need special equipment?
We often get asked if you need any special equipment to go from lead acid to lithium i.e. "What about charging?" and we'll cover that in the How to Charge your Lithium Battery section below.

If you are putting batteries in your RV for the first time, we recommend you have a pro do that for you and have them install at least 2 Safari UT 1300 batteries. Most RV dealers or repair shops can do that for you. We have a list of some of those dealers here.

You can use a standard battery charger and it will charge the lithium batteries just fine. However, since most chargers are designed for a lead acid battery, they are made to charge up to a certain voltage. On a lead acid battery their "full" is about 13.6V. The Safari UT 1300 can accept a charge up to 14.6V (full will be between 13.9V to 14.6V). So, most lead acid chargers will get the lithium batteries to nearly 13.6V and it will be about 80% full. That still is more energy than a lead acid battery. Some lead acid chargers are programmable, meaning you can set it to charge at certain rates. If your charger is programmable, set it to its highest setting in terms of volts i.e. "Lithium" or "Deep Cycle" or if it is customizable (i.e. Bulk, Absorb, Float or Equalize) set it to its highest voltage on each. It will basically be charging the lithium batteries faster and more completely. The built-in Battery Management System (BMS) will regulate the charge and shut it off when the battery is full.

For best performance, we recommend a lithium charger. It's a fairly inexpensive upgrade but well worth it.


HOW ARE OTHERS USING LITHIUM
POWER IN THEIR RV'S?


It's a great idea to see how others are using lithium power in the RV experiences that might enhance your RV experience. So, here a few RVers and how they connect and use the batteries... and other ideas too.


 

Step-by-Step: How to Build a Solar Panel System

Great for off grid living for van life, camper vans, RV's, truck campers, or your home! I also include the use of an inverter which is great for powering appliances and electronics that don't run off of 12V power.

I've had some questions from my followers on how I've supplied power while living and traveling in my truck camper. Hopefully this video can be helpful for those looking up how to install their own system. I setup a solar panel kit on my truck camper over 2 years ago and haven't had any issues with it. It's been super reliable and provided ample power for everything I've needed.

 

Installing and Using the Lion Safari UT 1300

I've been using lead acid batteries in my trailer but it's time to upgrade to lithium. I chose Lion's battery and love them!

I show you how I changed the batteries and it's made a big difference.

 

Testing and Using the Lion UT in My Home

I test a bunch of different products to use in a variety of ways. This video shows the Lion UT 1300 in use and provides actual data on its capacity, discharge rates and other key points.

I also have reviewed the Safari ME solar generator to power my whole home in a separate video. It's quite impressive (the Safari ME)!


OTHER GREAT SOLUTIONS TO CONSIDER


Besides the basics, there are several other great solutions you may want to have with you on your RV adventures. These products can make not only RVing more enjoyable, but they can also be used when you’re not RVing—around the house, the yard, in outbuildings, for everyday use or during emergencies. Check them out.

Reminder: As a reminder, the Safari ME is the safe, silent, and renewable solar generator we mentioned above. You can even plug in your RV to it and it becomes a “Shore Power” connection with its 2,000W of continuous output. It's expandable with the XP or expansion pack, and has optional solar panels too. It’s amazing!